American Non-Governmental Organizations Coalition for the International Criminal Court
Advocating for full US support of the ICC.
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International Justice Project joins AMICC as its 39th insitutional member. Will your organization join?

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AMICC announces the publication of a book on the creation of the ICC co-authored by its convener.

Read more about the debate in the US about the ICC.

New Materials

Read AMICC's new material on the usage of the Rome Statute by U.S. federal judges in U.S. case law, including an analysis on the subject.

Read AMICC's new advocacy document: A Case for Conservatives

Welcome to

Gross atrocities including genocide, massacres, rape as a military and political tactic, and the kidnapping of children to be soldiers spurred international outrage in the 1990s. Recognizing that these atrocities would continue if no action was taken against them, the world created the International Criminal Court to try the leaders most responsible for the worst and most atrocious acts of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Read More.

The United States is not a member of the Court, but the Obama administration provides important support to the Court and especially to its Prosecutor through a close and extensive relationship. This relationship must continue, grow and deepen. Read More.

Nurturing that growth is the mission of the American NGO Coalition for the International Criminal Court (AMICC). It supports its 39 organizational members in their campaigns of advocacy in the United States. This includes the long-term goal of US ratification of the Rome Statute, the Court’s charter treaty. AMICC supports its members by researching and preparing targeted materials, providing advocacy advice, answering ICC and policy questions, and maintaining a steady flow of information pertinent to their advocacy. AMICC also takes part in public outreach directly and in collaboration with its members. It coordinates advocacy with the Obama administration and Congress through its affiliate, the Washington Working Group on the International Criminal Court. Read More.

Current Issues and Updates

Latest News
  • Crime of Aggression: U.S. Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights, Sarah Sewall, speaks on the policy implications of the Rome Statute amendments on the crime of aggression.
  • Final Convictions: Both the Katanga and Lubanga cases at the ICC are complete.
  • Kenya: New appeals, a postponed trial date and the intimidation of witnesses in the Kenya cases.
  • Palestine: The OTP has initiated a preliminary examination into the situation in Palestine. Read further on the differences between Palestine's 2009 declaration and its 2015 declaration and ascension to the Rome Statute here.
  • Ukraine: Ukraine seeks jurisdiction of the ICC through a declaration accepting the Court's jurisdiction over crimes committed on Ukrainian territory from 21 November 2013 to 22 February 2014. Ratification of the Rome Statute by Ukraine is likely to follow soon.
  • Reparations for Victims: On 3 March 2015, the Appeals Chamber of the International Criminal Court issued its judgment on the appeals against the Trial Chamber's 2012 decision establishing principles that are to be applied to reparations for victims in the case against Thomas Lubanga Dyilo.
Latest Publications
  • Negotiating the International Criminal Court, New York to Rome, 1994-1998: Fanny Benedetti, Karine Bonneau, and John Washburn, Martinus Lijhoff, 2013.

    The story of the United Nations negotiations which produced, against all odds and expectations, the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court. It offers drama, suspense, clashes of powers and personalities, the new influence of civil society and a sudden leap into the future for international law.

  • Rough Justice: The International Criminal Court in a World of Power Politics: David Bosco, Oxford University Press, 2014.

    Rough Justice grapples with the Court's basic dilemma: designed to be apolitical, it requires the support of politicians who pursue national interests and answer to domestic audiences. Through a sharp analysis of the dynamics at work behind the scenes, Bosco assesses the ways in which powerful states have shaped the Court's effort to transform the vision of international justice into reality. This will be the definitive account of the Court and its uneven progress toward advancing accountability around the world.